Accountability

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Mayor Karen Weaver to Deliver Her First State of the City Address

By | Accountability, Community, Economic Development, Flint, Leadership, Media | No Comments

Flint Mayor Karen Weaver will give her first State of the City address before residents, community leaders and government officials Thursday, August 4, 2016 at 5:30 p.m. at Flint City Hall. Mayor Weaver and her team have been meeting with top officials, stakeholders, and City employees to better understand the work being done by many dedicated individuals and what more needs to be accomplished to move Flint forward on the road to recovery. Mayor Weaver will present the goals of her administration to the resilient Flint community and her plan to rebuild Flint the right way.

When:     Thursday, August 4, 2016  5:30 p.m. 

Where:    Flint City Hall (Council Chambers)
1101 S. Saginaw St. Flint, MI  48502

 

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Mayor and Project Manager of FAST Start Address Inaccurate Information

By | Accountability, Community, Media, Quality of Life, Safety | No Comments

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 14, 2016

 

Contact:
Kristin Moore
kmoore@cityofflint.com

Mayor and Project Manager of FAST Start Address Inaccurate Information Published about First Round of Pipes Replaced

 

(Flint, Mich) – Brigadier General Michael McDaniel, manager of Mayor Karen Weaver’s FAST Start initiative, spent Thursday afternoon in meetings regarding the next round of pipes replacements in the City of Flint. City officials are focused on the progress being made and want the public to be informed with the correct information on the work that’s being done.

After getting several requests for comment regarding an online media report stating more than a third of pipes replaced in the city earlier this year by Rowe Engineering as part of the state’s pilot study on the FAST Start plan were to homes that did not have high lead levels, McDaniel wanted to set the record straight.

“There is a lot of false and misleading information in the article,” stated General McDaniel. “First of all, the resident quoted in the article lives at an address that was not part of the FAST Start pilot study. The pipes at her house on Church Street were replaced by, and at the request of, Virginia Tech professor Marc Edwards.”

City officials also take issue with the amount of 15 parts per billion used in the article to define a “high lead” level. It’s important to note that 15 parts per billion is the federal action level, but Mayor Weaver, other officials and experts say action should be taken before the level of lead in citizens’ water reaches that point.

“The City of Flint has not and never will agree that 15 parts per billion is an acceptable level of lead in the water our residents drink,” said Mayor Weaver.

“As an example, the house on Church Street, which the article claims never submitted a water test, had a lead level of 13 parts per billion on March 16, prior to the pipe being replaced on April 6,” added McDaniel.

The article also implies the majority of the homes selected for the pipe replacements in the pilot study were not in the “high risk” categories set forth by Mayor Weaver which are homes with high lead levels, seniors, pregnant women, and/or children under the age of six. Selection of the homes was a collaborative effort between the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ), Rowe Engineering, U of M-Flint and the City.

“Some privacy laws prevented us from accessing data to confirm areas with pregnant mothers, so we relied on 2014 census records for information on neighborhoods with young children and senior citizens,” stated McDaniel.

Overall, McDaniel feels the state’s pilot study with Rowe Engineering, which cost around $250,000, was productive and will provide useful information that will be applied as the effort continues to replace lead tainted pipes in the City of Flint.

“This was truly a pilot study to find out what pipes were around the city and what the construction of the pipes were,” said McDaniel. “Homes were selected in every area in Flint. If we couldn’t get permission from a homeowner to do the work, we went to the next house on the list. According to our test results, an overwhelming majority of the homes where pipes were replaced showed a significant decrease in lead levels in the water, that is what’s important.”

“We have no intention of responding to every media report we disagree with,” Mayor Weaver added. “But, it would be doing the public a disservice to know they are getting bad information and we not take time to address it.”

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Big Job Ahead for Flint Charter Review Commission

By | Accountability, Community, Flint | No Comments

FLINT, MI — Voters have chosen the nine members of the Flint Charter Review Commission.

Now comes the hard part: Rewriting what some describe as the city’s constitution for the first time in more than 40 years.

Unofficial results from the Tuesday, May 5 election showed these nine candidates winning in the race to serve on the commission: John D. Cherry, Brian Larkin, Cleora Magee, Victoria McKenze, Charles Metcalfe, Heidi Phaneuf, James Richardson, Marsha Wesley, and Barry Williams.

Other candidates on the ballot Tuesday were Melodee Mabbitt, Stephen Mintline, Jerry Preston, and Nayyirah Shariff.

Cherry, the top vote-getter, said the commission has a big, important job ahead.

“We’re going to have to … spend a lot of time talking to folks and finding out the biggest concerns are and figure out how we can reflect those changes” they want, Cherry said.

Tuesday’s election came after more than 56 percent of Flint voters approved moving ahead with the election of a charter commission in November.

http://www.mlive.com/news/flint/index.ssf/2015/05/big_job_ahead_for_nine_elected.html

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The Public Should be Outraged!

By | Accountability, Flint, Leadership, Michigan, Quality of Life | No Comments

As a concerned citizen, and a lifelong resident of the city of Flint, I am saddened and disappointed about the situation we find ourselves in, in 2014. To listen to the rhetoric, the noise coming from the Emergency Financial Manager, Darnell Early, and the recommendations coming from the twenty two members comprising the Blue Ribbon Committee is outlandish.

 

First and foremost, the legitimacy of the committee is in doubt. According to The Charter Revision Handbook, Michigan Municipal League, page 5, a change in form of government requires a charter revision. More specifically, “revision of city charters may be initiated by a resolution adopted by 3/5 of the legislative body or by petition signed by at least five percent of the registered voters, unless the present charter provides otherwise.” Whichever way this is achieved, the decision to revise the charter is one that is voted on by the people.

 

Additionally, a nine member commission committee must also be selected to do the revisions, and none of these committee members can be an elected or appointed official. The committee must also be voted on by the people. These are just a few but very important violations committed by this Blue Ribbon Committee, which was put in place by the EFM.

 

Where is the outrage over such terrible violations of the city charter and the rights of the people of the city of Flint? Where is the open meeting discussion from the people? To take it a step further, city council asked for a special meeting to give the people and themselves adequate time to discuss the recommendations in a public setting, their request was denied as well. It’s beginning to be more shameful and ridiculous that this kind of behavior is being forced on the people.

 

We are being told that these are recommendations that we are going to vote on. The question in one’s mind is: are these legitimate recommendations by an illegitimate group? This has the perceived spirit of a return to 50 years ago; to fall under this kind of dictatorship! In order to not go back 50 years, the public should be well versed, and it should be openly discussed among Flint voters, not just 22, but 80,000 plus registered voters. The entire voice of the Flint residents should be the Blue Ribbon Committee. Are some of the recommendations good? That has yet to be determined; the process certainly was not.

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